5 Voices in Poetry We Look Forward To

by Crystal Vega-Huerta For those who have not limited themselves to the canon, but instead have read from the outpouring of work from lesser heard voices in both published works and literary journals, will find women poets at the forefront of a fantastic year for poetry.  While the work of women poets on the end-of-year lists…

5 South East Asian Women Poets You Should Be Reading Right Now

In the recent months, sufficient controversy & public discourse has been generated about the popularity of Rupi Kaur – a Canadian poet of South Asian descent. Kaur has gained substantial international fan-following via social media, Instagram in particular, for writing condensed verses accompanied by minimalistic sketches that skim over subjects pertaining to immigrant life, gendered…

Book Review : Pizza and Warfare

Published by Garden Door Press Author : Nikki Wallschlaeger Price : $10.00 Pizza and Warfare by Nikki Wallschlaeger‏ opens with a facebook post about a visit to an optometrist’s office. It describes the humdrum act of getting your eyesight checked, suddenly decussating it with an investigation of instructional language so rampant in use throughout our daily lives. The…

Fight like a Girl

10 Eponymous. The most ignorant myth perpetuated about childhood abuse is that all sufferers/survivors must have experienced some form of measurable or visible violence. If the story isn’t grafted on your physical skin, it is possibly untrue. That if your devastation hasn’t been continual and corporeal, it wasn’t exigent. That you MUST have always hated…

The Good Survivor Myth

In my early 20s, as part of a training program in psychotherapy, I had the opportunity to sit through a series of observership cases with my guide/mentor who specializes in doing work with women who experienced PTSD/MDD. After one of the more harrowing sessions, the young girl we were consulting with waited back for the…

Lost Rooms

Growing up in an Indo-Rroma culture, you are expected to be thankful that your body is safe, that you get an education and get a job and be sufficiently independent so as to not be throttled daily by the immensity of a patriarchal inheritance stalking your every movement. Mental health isn’t even a dot on the radar. When I decided to study psychology early on, it was partially because I had already been through so many dirty corridors of indeterminate analysis and loud opinions that I knew the best path to understanding what I was experiencing was to study it myself. This was the beginning of a long and punishing dissent. I still remember pouring over my textbooks of Therapeutic Practices in Clinical Psychology with a nearly unhinged jaw as I read description upon description of every conceivable DSM disorder and almost all of them included a not-so-subtle exegesis that as a third world brown woman, I was almost 50% more likely to have a mental health condition and the scope for relevant support systems to help better my situations was slim to nil. In others, simpler words — I was fucked.